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DIAGNOSIS: ASTHMA

You Can Have Either Acute or

Chronic Bronchitis

Some times symptoms from two very different mechanisms can be confused. Bronchitis exhibits many of the same symptoms that asthma does; however, asthma is caused by allergic reactions whereas bronchitis is a bronchial infection that's caused by either bacteria, yeast or viruses. When one inhales smoke, those particles sit in the lungs. Over time, the tiny hairs called cilia burn off. The cilia are the way that mucus gets swept out of the lungs. They all move in tandem to produce a flow. This flow pushes the mucus up and out of the lung wall into the throat where it's swallowed. If one doesn't have cilia, any longer, then particles and mucus start building up in the lungs. This acts like a breeding ground for bacteria and other culprits. If they take up residence inside the lungs, that’s called pneumonia. If it takes up residence, or causes irritation and inflammation in the bronchial tubes, it's called bronchitis. When this happens, bronchitis is oftentimes the result. Bronchitis means 'inflammation of the bronchial tubes'. The symptoms are very similar to what you'd see with asthma. There will be coughing, and wheezing. It's oftentimes there because you had a cold or upper- respiratory ailment. If you have COPD, or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, which is common with those who smoked in the past, your chances of getting bronchitis is greatly increased.  Acute bronchitis should improve in just a few days; you should have no ill effects, afterwards, either. However, you might cough for weeks afterwards. Chronic bronchitis, on the other hand, is the one which is associated with COPD. Generally they will just try and relieve all the symptoms or ease your breathing. As with asthma, bronchitis can have similar symptoms, which include: Wheezing, fatigue, a cough, mucus that's either white, yellow-gray or green, and chest discomfort. However, some things you won't experience with asthma are a slight fever and chills. That nagging cough that keeps on lasting afterwards is common with bronchitis. Also, sometimes you don't produce any mucus when you have bronchitis. Children, in particular, will swallow the mucus, thus making it look like they have none. You can get chronic bronchitis without first getting acute bronchitis. If you smoke, and in the morning when you get up you have to clear your throat al lot, and that happens for more than a few months… then you probably have chronic bronchitis.

You Can Have Either

Acute or Chronic

Bronchitis

Some times symptoms from two very different mechanisms can be confused. Bronchitis exhibits many of the same symptoms that asthma does; however, asthma is caused by allergic reactions whereas bronchitis is a bronchial infection that's caused by either bacteria, yeast or viruses. When one inhales smoke, those particles sit in the lungs. Over time, the tiny hairs called cilia burn off. The cilia are the way that mucus gets swept out of the lungs. They all move in tandem to produce a flow. This flow pushes the mucus up and out of the lung wall into the throat where it's swallowed. If one doesn't have cilia, any longer, then particles and mucus start building up in the lungs. This acts like a breeding ground for bacteria and other culprits. If they take up residence inside the lungs, that’s called pneumonia. If it takes up residence, or causes irritation and inflammation in the bronchial tubes, it's called bronchitis. When this happens, bronchitis is oftentimes the result. Bronchitis means 'inflammation of the bronchial tubes'. The symptoms are very similar to what you'd see with asthma. There will be coughing, and wheezing. It's oftentimes there because you had a cold or upper-respiratory ailment. If you have COPD, or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, which is common with those who smoked in the past, your chances of getting bronchitis is greatly increased.  Acute bronchitis should improve in just a few days; you should have no ill effects, afterwards, either. However, you might cough for weeks afterwards. Chronic bronchitis, on the other hand, is the one which is associated with COPD. Generally they will just try and relieve all the symptoms or ease your breathing. As with asthma, bronchitis can have similar symptoms, which include: Wheezing, fatigue, a cough, mucus that's either white, yellow-gray or green, and chest discomfort. However, some things you won't experience with asthma are a slight fever and chills. That nagging cough that keeps on lasting afterwards is common with bronchitis. Also, sometimes you don't produce any mucus when you have bronchitis. Children, in particular, will swallow the mucus, thus making it look like they have none. You can get chronic bronchitis without first getting acute bronchitis. If you smoke, and in the morning when you get up you have to clear your throat a lot, and that happens for more than a few months… then you probably have chronic bronchitis.
DIAGNOSIS: ASTHMA