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DIAGNOSIS: ASTHMA

Using a Nebulizer if You Have Severe

Respiratory Problems

A Nebulizer is a kind of inhaler that's used in a hospital and home setting. If you have COPD that's combined with asthma, they might have you use a Nebulizer. There are many different kinds of out there, but they tend to all have some things in common with each other. They can stand on your counter or night stand, and are powered by either batteries or from the wall outlet. The John Bunn Penquin Nebulizer costs about $50, but there are many manufacturers out there. If you go to Google and type 'children's Nebulizer' or 'pediatric Nebulizer' you'll find all sorts of different styles such as even a fire truck. Originally, it worked by forcing air through the liquid that you want aspirated. However, recently, nebulizers have been designed which can use electronics to disperse the fluid into a mist. It's used to dispense a mist into the lungs. This is useful when you have such diseases as cystic fibrosis, asthma or other respiratory diseases such as COPD, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. I won't replace 'metered-dose' inhalers, because they aren't portable enough to do that. They might be able to be not as expensive as they used to be, what with needing huge compressed-air tanks or other 'atomizing gasses'; but they're still not as portable as an inhaler would be. The new electronic version such as are made by Pari eFlow, the Respironics i- Neb or Omron MicroAir are getting much smaller than they used to be. These work via vibrating membranes or meshes. The liquid is pumped onto the vibrating membrane, which then acts like a little trampoline for the mist to end up separated and misted into the air. Other companies which make the electronic devices are Aerogen Aeronet and the Beurer Nebulizer IH30. They take the solution as a liquid, which you have to load into the device before you begin. Bronchodilaters are also available such as the saiburtamol USAN. Corticosteroids or ipratropium are oftentimes the drugs which are being atomized. This mist is then drawn into the lungs where the mist coats the lungs. So, a Nebulizer is getting less and less of a price as time goes along. Cheaper nebulizers mean that they will be able to be gotten out to a more diverse population of people.

Using a Nebulizer if

You Have Severe

Respiratory Problems

A Nebulizer is a kind of inhaler that's used in a hospital setting, usually. If you have COPD that's combined with asthma, they might have you use a Nebulizer. There are many different kinds of nebulizers out there, but they tend to all have some things in common with each other. They sit on your counter or night stand, they are powered by either batteries or from the wall outlet. If they're for adults, they look official, with a gray or tan case and buttons which all make it look like a DVD player, or such. If it's for kids it'll look like a penguin, or other cute character. The John Bunn Penquin Nebulizer costs about $50, but there are many manufacturers out there. If you go to Google and type 'children's Nebulizer' or 'pediatric Nebulizer' you'll find all sorts of different styles such as even a fire truck. Originally, a Nebulizer worked by forcing air through the liquid that you want aspirated. However, recently, a new variant has been designed which can use electronics to disperse the fluid into a mist. It's used to dispense a mist into the lungs. This is useful when you have such diseases as cystic fibrosis, asthma or other respiratory diseases such as COPD, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. It won't replace 'metered-dose' inhalers, because they aren't portable enough to do that. They might be able to be not as expensive as they used to be, what with needing huge compressed-air tanks or other 'atomizing gases'; but they're still not as portable as an inhaler would be. The new electronic version such as are made by Pari eFlow, the Respironics i- Neb or Omron MicroAir are getting much smaller than they used to be. These work via vibrating membranes or meshes. The liquid is pumped onto the vibrating membrane, which then acts like a little trampoline for the mist to end up separated and misted into the air. Other companies which make the electronic devices are Aerogen Aeronet and the Beurer Nebulizer IH30. They take the solution as a liquid, which you have to load into the device before you begin. Bronchodilators are also available such as the saiburtamol USAN. Corticosteroids or ipratropium are oftentimes the drugs which are being atomized. This mist is then drawn into the lungs where the mist coats the lungs. So, a Nebulizer is getting less and less of a price as time goes along. Cheaper Nebulizers mean that they will be able to be gotten out to a more diverse population of people.
DIAGNOSIS: ASTHMA