free hit counters
DIAGNOSIS: ASTHMA

So You're Having an Asthma

Attack

When you have an asthma attack, particularly if it's the first time you ever had one, it can be a frightening experience. If they occur within minutes, you might not have any warning. If they're an acute attack, you won't have much else to do but panic the first time. However, realize that the thing you should do is the opposite from what you'd think you would do. The problem is, your body starts reacting in a way where you gasp in big gulps of air. This is counter to the process which will really get you through an allergic asthma attack. Breathe slow. Don't take in big gulps of air. When you gulp air, it lets out too much carbon dioxide from your blood. Your body needs some carbon dioxide in order to properly metabolize oxygen. So, when you gulp air, you're really not gulping more oxygen, you're letting out more carbon dioxide. When that occurs, you need more oxygen, so your body sends the wrong signal to you and you try breathing in even more oxygen, which causes more carbon dioxide to be pumped out of your body. This is a counter-productive breathing technique. You know this is true when you consider what hyperventilation is. When you breathe too much, you start gasping for air. You'll get light-headed. That means you're not getting enough air. So, a person has been breathing too much, and they start losing the ability to breathe. Strange, but true. Studies done by a Dr. Buteyko in Russia showed that asthmatics breath more often, and take in more breaths than regular people do. His techniques showed that you can re- teach yourself how to breathe slower, thus giving you more oxygen. Breathe less, get more oxygen. Yes, it's a strange concept, but it works. I once went to a Buyeyko meeting. They would have you pinch your nose, close your mouth, and run around the table as many times as you can without breathing. Studies had shown that those who did this, and got good at it, could hold their breath for much longer periods of time. This is a very handy trait for those with asthma. Instead, you must fight the fear. You must calm down and concentrate your mind to breath much slower than you'd imagine you should. With a calm concentration, you start breathing very slowly in. Put one hand on your stomach and another on your chest. First, it will take your mind off your inability to breathe, and second you'll be able to tell whether any air is entering your stomach. You should only breathe from your lungs in a slow, methodical fashion if you're having an asthma attack.

So You're Having an

Asthma Attack

When you have an asthma attack, particularly if it's the first time you ever had one, they can be frightening. Their progression can either be slow, or incredibly rapid. If they occur within minutes, you might not have any warning. If they're an acute attack, you won't have much else to do but panic the first time. However, realize that the thing you should do is the opposite from what you'd think you would do. The problem is, your body starts reacting in a way where you gasp in big gulps of air. This is counter to the process which will really get you through an allergic asthma attack. Breathe slow. Don't take in big gulps of air. When you gulp air, it lets out too much carbon dioxide from your blood. Your body needs some carbon dioxide in order to properly metabolize oxygen. So, when you gulp air, you're really not gulping more oxygen, you're letting out more carbon dioxide. When that occurs, you need more oxygen, so your body sends the wrong signal to you and you try breathing in even more oxygen, which causes more carbon dioxide to be pumped out of your body. This is a counter-productive breathing technique. You know this is true when you consider what hyperventilation is. When you breathe too much, you start gasping for air. You'll get light-headed. That means you're not getting enough air. So, a person has been breathing too much, and they start losing the ability to breathe. Strange, but true. Studies done by a Dr. Buteyko in Russia showed that asthmatics breath more often, and take in more breaths than regular people do. His techniques showed that you can re-teach yourself how to breathe slower, thus giving you more oxygen. Breathe less, get more oxygen. Yes, it's a strange concept, but it works. I once went to a Buyeyko meeting. They would have you pinch your nose, close your mouth, and run around the table as many times as you can without breathing. Studies had shown that those who did this, and got good at it, could hold their breath for much longer periods of time. This is a very handy trait for those with asthma. Instead, you must fight the fear. You must calm down and concentrate your mind to breath much slower than you'd imagine you should. With a calm concentration, you start breathing very slowly in. Put one hand on your stomach and another on your chest. First, it will take your mind off your inability to breathe, and second you'll be able to tell whether any air is entering your stomach. You should only breathe from your lungs in a slow, methodical fashion if you're having an asthma attack.
DIAGNOSIS: ASTHMA