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DIAGNOSIS: ASTHMA

Pediatric Asthma

If you’re son or daughter has been diagnosed with pediatric asthma, you’ll have to determine what might be the reason for this condition. Since asthma is often associated with allergies, finding the particular allergen is very important. However, determining the allergen is a way of staying away from that problem. Animals should be the first thought. Do you own a cat or dog? Both the hair of animals, and their dandruff, can be the problem. If it is determined that the animal is the problem, consider getting rid of the animal. First, though, you’ll have to determine whether the animal is the problem. Did you just buy the animal, then just a few days (or hours) after the animal was there, was that when they came down with the first symptoms? If so, get rid of it, quick. Animal fur and dander tend to get into the rugs, where it can be very difficult to remove. Ripping up the rugs and replacing them with tile or hardwood floors isn’t the best form of action if you can just remove the offending animal from your house before the problem gets even worse. If you have had the animal a long time, you’ll have to give it to a neighbor or friend for awhile… then clean up the house completely, before you can determine whether this is the problem. Certainly there are clues if this is the case. Does you child have problems just after having petted the cat? Do they start breathing worse when they feed the animal? Sometimes there can be a buildup of dander around the dog’s food dish, for example. Dandruff is basically dead skin, so removing this source can be the real problem. You can try using Head and Shoulders to get rid of your pet’s dandruff problem. Since dandruff is a fungus (malassezia, previously known as pityrosproum ovale), then it is treated with aniifungals. Zinc pyrithione is the drug of action in the product, but generic versions just don’t work as well, for some reason. Johnson and Johnson got something right, because when you use products which list the same ingredients, they don’t work as well. So, if your child is experiencing pediatric asthma, remove the pollutants which might be causing the problem. Realize, that if they’re having problems in the springtime, the problem might be related to either pollen, which comes from the flowers, or mold, which comes from the increased moisture in the air from spring rains. If they seem to have increased symptoms when they go into a field of flowers, the problem is pollen. However, if they have problems just after they went in the damp cellar, then problem is fungus. Sometimes the asthma symptoms are just one of many symptoms which can occur. If they get a red rash when they’re around mud, then it’s an allergy to fungus, because fungus is oftentimes in mud. Watch what they were doing when they had the problem. If they just splashed in a mud puddle and they come into the house with mud on their clothes, then have the asthmatic symptoms, that’s a clue.

Pediatric Asthma

If you’re son or daughter has pediatric asthma, consider giving them relief. First, you’ll have to determine what might be the offending substance. Since asthma oftentimes is associated with allergies, finding the particular offending agent is important. Yes, you should also treat the symptoms, which can be done by taking your child to the physician an have him prescribe an appropriate level of medication. However, determining the allergen is a way of staying away from that problem. Animals should be the first thought. Do you own a cat or dog? Both the hair of animals, and their dandruff, can be the problem. If it is determined that the animal is the problem, consider getting rid of the animal. First, though, you’ll have to determine whether the animal is the problem. Did you just buy the animal, then just a few days (or hours) after the animal was there, was that when they came down with the first symptoms? If so, get rid of it, quick. Animal fur and dander tend to get into the rugs, where it can be very difficult to remove. Ripping up the rugs and replacing them with tile or hardwood floors isn’t the best form of action if you can just remove the offending animal from your house before the problem gets even worse. If you have had the animal a long time, you’ll have to give it to a neighbor or friend for awhile… then clean up the house completely, before you can determine whether this is the problem. Certainly there are clues if this is the case. Does you child have problems just after having petted the cat? Do they start breathing worse when they feed the animal? Sometimes there can be a buildup of dander around the dog’s food dish, for example. Dandruff is basically dead skin, so removing this source can be the real problem. You can try using Head and Shoulders to get rid of your pet’s dandruff problem. Since dandruff is a fungus (malassezia, previously known as pityrosproum ovale), then it is treated with aniifungals. Zinc pyrithione is the drug of action in the product, but generic versions just don’t work as well, for some reason. Johnson and Johnson got something right, because when you use products which list the same ingredients, they don’t work as well. So, if your child is experiencing pediatric asthma, remove the pollutants which might be causing the problem. Realize, that if they’re having problems in the springtime, the problem might be related to either pollen, which comes from the flowers, or mold, which comes from the increased moisture in the air from spring rains. If they seem to have increased symptoms when they go into a field of flowers, the problem is pollen. However, if they have problems just after they went in the damp cellar, then problem is fungus. Sometimes the asthma symptoms are just one of many symptoms which can occur. If they get a red rash when they’re around mud, then it’s an allergy to fungus, because fungus is oftentimes in mud. Watch what they were doing when they had the problem. If they just splashed in a mud puddle and they come into the house with mud on their clothes, then have the asthmatic symptoms, that’s a clue.
DIAGNOSIS: ASTHMA