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DIAGNOSIS: ASTHMA

Allergic Induced Asthma

Allergy induced asthma is a mis-fortunate ailment to experience. The first times one has asthma, they often think they’re having a heart attack. An attack, because it is oftentimes associated with tightness in the chest, raises panic. Whether the panic is a causative factor in the progression of the asthma is still inconclusive, but it seems that as one starts to panic, one increases their breathing rate. As you increase your rate of breathing, this causes more carbon dioxide to be released from your bloodstream. Once the level of carbon dioxide is reduced, there is a certain level of carbon dioxide in the blood which is necessary for oxygen to properly be assimilated by the blood. As the levels of carbon dioxide drop below this threshold, a person starts gasping even more. This recursive problem continues until the gasping causes even more of a drop in carbon dioxide levels. The way to stop this cycle is to breathe less, strange enough. The Buyeyko method utilizes this concept. Designed by a Russian physician, this program centers around learning how to breathe less to increase the amount of oxygen that goes to your body. ‘Hyperventilating’ is an example of this in action. The reason that breathing into a paper bag works is… it concentrates the amount of carbon dioxide that you’re breathing, which allows the oxygen to start be taken back in, in higher quantities once more, which increases the overall oxygen levels in the body, which stops the gasping, which stops the inability to breathe. Therefore, by doing exercises which re- teach you to not gasp so much all the time, this might get your asthma in check. Allergy induced asthma, though, has a large ‘allergy’ component to the problem. Something is occurring in the body when you’re being exposed to a particular allergen which causes the bronchial passageways to dilate. As this occurs, the flow of air will be restricted. If you remove that allergen from the air, the problem will dissipate. Thus, treating the air so that it removes the particulates which cause the problem can be a solution, at least when you’re in a home environment. Rugs can hold allergens. If you have allergic asthma, remove the rugs from your house and replace them with tile or hardwood floors. Since chemicals are also a thing which can trigger asthma, don’t coat the wood floors with polyurethane. Use simple applications of wax, instead. Have the person breathe the wax before you add it to the floor, so they aren’t inadvertently exposed to an allergen that would be difficult to remove from the floor. Acetone might remove the wax, but it would also suck out moisture which might dull the wood floors afterwards. Also, acetone, itself, might prove to be an allergen. Allergy induced asthma can be controlled by removing the allergen.

Allergic Induced Asthma

Allergy induced asthma is a mis-fortunate ailment to experience. The first times one has asthma, they often think they’re having a heart attack. An attack, because it is oftentimes associated with tightness in the chest, raises panic. Whether the panic is a causative factor in the progression of the asthma is still inconclusive, but it seems that as one starts to panic, one increases their breathing rate. As you increase your rate of breathing, this causes more carbon dioxide to be released from your bloodstream. Once the level of carbon dioxide is reduced, there is a certain level of carbon dioxide in the blood which is necessary for oxygen to properly be assimilated by the blood. As the levels of carbon dioxide drop below this threshold, a person starts gasping even more. This recursive problem continues until the gasping causes even more of a drop in carbon dioxide levels. The way to stop this cycle is to breathe less, strange enough. The Buyeyko method utilizes this concept. Designed by a Russian physician, this program centers around learning how to breathe less to increase the amount of oxygen that goes to your body. ‘Hyperventilating’ is an example of this in action. The reason that breathing into a paper bag works is… it concentrates the amount of carbon dioxide that you’re breathing, which allows the oxygen to start be taken back in, in higher quantities once more. This  increases the overall oxygen levels in the body, which stops the gasping, which stops the inability to breathe. Therefore, by doing exercises which re-teach you to not gasp so much all the time, this might get your asthma in check. Allergy induced asthma, though, has a large ‘allergy’ component to the problem. Something is occurring in the body when you’re being exposed to a particular allergen which causes the bronchial passageways to dilate. As this occurs, the flow of air will be restricted. If you remove that allergen from the air, the problem will dissipate. Thus, treating the air so that it removes the particulates which cause the problem can be a solution, at least when you’re in a home environment. Rugs can hold allergens. If you have allergic asthma, remove the rugs from your house and replace them with tile or hardwood floors. Since chemicals are also a thing which can trigger asthma, don’t coat the wood floors with polyurethane. Use simple applications of wax, instead. Have the person breathe the wax before you add it to the floor, so they aren’t inadvertently exposed to an allergen that would be difficult to remove from the floor. Acetone might remove the wax, but it would also suck out moisture which might dull the wood floors afterwards. Also, acetone, itself, might prove to be an allergen. Allergy induced asthma can be controlled by removing the allergen.
DIAGNOSIS: ASTHMA